Vegan Supplements That Every Vegan Should Take

There is a list of vegan supplements that every vegan should know. We will present to you and explain why these supplements are so important for a vegan diet.

A common problem among vegans is that their diet cannot meet all their daily nutrient requirements. Some of these nutrients come from animal products, which vegan wants to avoid.

Nutritional deficiencies could lead to health problems. You can be at higher risk of having digestion problems, skin disorders, bone problems, and dementia.

To help you meet your daily nutrient requirements while on a vegan diet, this article explores the top supplements that could help you get the right amount of important nutrients.

Most Important Vegan Supplements

1. Vitamin B12

Foods often touted to be rich in vitamin B12 include unwashed organic produce, mushrooms grown in B12-rich soils, nori, spirulina, chlorella, and nutritional yeast.

Some believe vegans who eat enough of the right plant foods don’t need to worry about vitamin B12 deficiency.

However, there is no scientific basis for this belief.

Several studies show that while anyone can have low vitamin B12 levels, vegetarians and vegans have a higher risk of deficiency. This seems especially true for vegans who are not taking any supplements.

Related: Signs And Symptoms Of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

Vitamin B12 is important for many bodily processes, including protein metabolism and the formation of oxygen-transporting red blood cells. It also plays a crucial role in the health of your nervous system.

Too little vitamin B12 can lead to anemia and nervous system damage, as well as infertility and bone and heart disease.

The daily recommended intake is 2.4 mcg per day for adults, 2.6 mcg per day during pregnancy, and 2.8 mcg per day while breastfeeding.

The only scientifically proven way for vegans to reach these levels is by consuming B12-fortified foods or taking a vitamin B12 supplement. B12-fortified foods commonly include plant milk, soy products, breakfast cereals, and nutritional yeast.

What’s more, no scientific evidence supports depending on unwashed organic produce as a reliable source of vitamin B12.

Nutritional yeast only contains vitamin B12 when fortified. However, vitamin B12 is light-sensitive and may degrade if bought from or stored in clear plastic bags.

Related: Nutritional Yeast Side Effects

It’s important to keep in mind that vitamin B12 is best absorbed in small doses. Thus, the less frequently you ingest vitamin B12, the more you need to take.

This is why vegans who are unable to reach the recommended daily intake using fortified foods should opt for a daily supplement providing 25–100 mcg of cyanocobalamin or a weekly dosage of 2,000 mcg.

Those wary of taking supplements may find it reassuring to get their blood levels of vitamin B12 checked before taking any.

Finally, your ability to absorb vitamin B12 decreases with age. Therefore, the Institute of Medicine recommends that everyone over the age of 51 — vegan or not — consider fortified foods or a vitamin B12 supplement.

You can purchase vitamin B-12 supplements online, here. 

2. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps enhance the absorption of calcium and phosphorus from your gut.

This vitamin also influences many other bodily processes, including immune function, mood, memory, and muscle recovery.

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D for children and adults is 600 IU (15 mcg) per day. The elderly, as well as pregnant or lactating women, should aim for 800 IU (20 mcg) per day.

That said, some evidence suggests that your daily requirements are far greater than the current RDA.

Unfortunately, very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, and foods fortified with vitamin D are often considered insufficient to satisfy the daily requirements.

This could partly explain the worldwide reports of vitamin D deficiency among vegans and omnivores alike.

Aside from the small amount you get from your diet, vitamin D can be made from sun exposure. Most people likely make enough vitamin D by spending 15 minutes in the midday sun when the sun is strong — as long as they don’t use any sunscreen and expose most of their skin.

However, the elderly, people with darker skin, those who live in northern latitudes or colder climates, and those who spend little time outdoors may be unable to produce enough.

Furthermore, because of the known negative effects of excess UV radiation, many dermatologists warn against using sun exposure to boost vitamin D levels.

The best way vegans can ensure they’re getting enough vitamin D is to have their blood levels tested. Those unable to get enough from fortified foods and sunshine should consider taking a daily vitamin D2 or vegan vitamin D3 supplement, you can buy it online here.

Although vitamin D2 is probably adequate for most people, some studies suggest that vitamin D3 is more effective at raising blood levels of vitamin D.

Related: Vitamin D Food Sources For Vegetarians 

3. Long-chain omega-3s

Omega-3 fatty acids can be split into two categories:

Essential omega-3 fatty acids: Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the only essential omega-3 fatty acid, meaning you can only get it from your diet.
Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: This category includes eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). They are not considered essential because your body can make them from ALA.

Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids play a structural role in your brain and eyes. Adequate dietary levels also seem important for brain development and reducing the risk of inflammation, depression, breast cancer, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Plants with high ALA content include flax seeds, chia seeds, walnuts, hemp seeds, and soybeans. EPA and DHA are mostly found in animal products like fatty fish and fish oil.

Getting enough ALA should theoretically maintain adequate EPA and DHA levels. However, studies estimate that the conversion of ALA to EPA may be as low as 5–10%, while its conversion to DHA may be near 2–5%.

Additionally, research consistently shows that vegetarians and vegans have up to 50% lower blood and tissue concentrations of EPA and DHA than omnivores.

Most health professionals agree that 200–300 mg per day should be sufficient.

Vegans can reach this recommended intake by supplementing with algae oil.

Related: Omega-3 Rich Foods

4. Iodine

Getting enough iodine is crucial for healthy thyroid function, which controls your metabolism.

An iodine deficiency during pregnancy and early infancy can result in irreversible intellectual disability.

In adults, insufficient iodine intake can lead to hypothyroidism.

This can cause various symptoms, such as low energy levels, dry skin, tingling in your hands and feet, forgetfulness, depression, and weight gain.

Vegans are considered at risk of iodine deficiency, and studies report that vegans have up to 50% lower blood iodine levels than vegetarians.

The RDA for adults is 150 mcg of iodine per day. Pregnant women should aim for 220 mcg per day, while those who are breastfeeding are recommended to further increase their daily intake to 290 mcg per day.

Iodine levels in plant foods depend on the iodine content of the soil in which they were grown. For instance, food grown close to the ocean tends to be higher in iodine.

The only foods considered to have consistently high iodine levels are iodized salt, seafood, seaweed, and dairy products, which pick up iodine from solutions used to clean cows and farm equipment.

Half a teaspoon (2.5 ml) of iodized salt is sufficient to meet your daily needs.

Vegans who do not want to consume iodized salt or eat seaweed several times per week should consider taking an iodine supplement.

5. Iron

Iron is a nutrient used to make new DNA and red blood cells, as well as carry oxygen in the blood. It’s also needed for energy metabolism.

Too little iron can lead to anemia and symptoms like fatigue and decreased immune function.

The RDA is 8 mg for adult men and post-menopausal women. It increases to 18 mg per day for adult women, and pregnant women should aim for 27 mg per day.

Iron can be found in two forms: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is only available from animal products, whereas non-heme iron is found in plants.

Because heme iron is more easily absorbed from your diet than non-heme iron, vegans are often recommended to aim for 1.8 times the normal RDA. That said, more studies are needed to establish whether such high intakes are needed.

Vegans with a low iron intake should aim to eat more iron-rich foods, such as cruciferous vegetables, beans, peas, dried fruit, nuts, and seeds. Iron-fortified foods, such as cereals, enriched bread, and some plant milk, can further help.

Also, using cast-iron pots and pans to cook, avoiding tea or coffee with meals, and combining iron-rich foods with a source of vitamin C can help boost iron absorption.

The best way to determine whether supplements are necessary is to get your hemoglobin and ferritin levels checked by your health practitioner.

Unnecessary intake of supplements like iron can do more harm than good by damaging cells or blocking the absorption of other minerals.

Extremely high levels can even cause convulsions, lead to organ failure or coma, and be fatal in some cases. Thus, it’s best not to supplement unless it’s truly necessary.

6. Calcium

Calcium is a mineral that’s necessary for good bone and teeth health. It also plays a role in muscle function, nerve signaling, and heart health.

The RDA for calcium is set at 1,000 mg per day for most adults and increases to 1,200 mg per day for adults over the age of 50.

Plant sources of calcium include bok choy, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, watercress, broccoli, chickpeas, calcium-set tofu, and fortified plant milk or juices.

However, studies tend to agree that most vegans don’t get enough calcium.

An often-heard remark among the vegan community is that vegans have lower calcium needs than omnivores because they do not use this mineral to neutralize the acidity produced by a meat-rich diet.

More research is needed to evaluate how meatless diets affect daily calcium requirements. However, evidence suggests that vegans consuming less than 525 mg of calcium tend to have an increased risk of bone fractures.

For this reason, all vegans are encouraged to aim for the RDA, making sure they consume at least 525 mg of calcium per day. Supplements should be used if this can’t be achieved through diet or fortified foods alone.

7. Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that’s crucial for metabolism, immune function, and the repair of body cells.

An insufficient intake of zinc can lead to developmental problems, hair loss, diarrhea, and delayed wound healing.

The RDA for zinc is currently set at 8–11 mg per day for adults. It increases to 11–12 mg for pregnant women and 12–13 mg for lactating women.

Few plant foods contain high amounts of zinc. Moreover, zinc absorption from some plant foods is limited due to their phytate content. Thus, vegetarians are encouraged to aim for 1.5 times the RDA.

While not all vegans have low blood levels of zinc, a recent review of 26 studies showed that vegetarians — and especially vegans — have lower zinc intakes and slightly lower blood levels of zinc than omnivores.

To maximize your intake, eat a variety of zinc-rich foods throughout the day. These include whole grains, wheat germ, tofu, sprouted bread, legumes, nuts, and seeds.

Soaking nuts, seeds, and legumes overnight, eating enough protein, and consuming fermented foods, such as tempeh and miso, also seems to boost absorption.

Vegans concerned about their zinc intake or those with symptoms of a deficiency may consider taking daily zinc gluconate or zinc citrate supplement that provides 50–100% of the RDA.


Conclusion: These supplements mentioned above are important if you are vegetarian. Certain nutrient requirements may be difficult to achieve through diet and fortified foods alone. This is especially true for vitamin B12, vitamin D, and long-chain omega-3s.

References: medicaldaily.com  healthline.com

Most important supplements for vegetarians

Please like us and pin this post:
error
"teoshealtylifestyle.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *