Vitamin E And Vitamin E Oil Health Benefits

Today we will try to explain what are the health benefits of Vitamin E, how and for what to use Vitamin E Oil and to see what is recommended a daily dosage of this vitamin.

vitamin E oil

Vitamin E is a vitamin that dissolves in fat. It is found in many foods including vegetable oils, cereals, meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and wheat germ oil. It is also available as a supplement.

Vitamin E is used for treating vitamin E deficiency, which is rare but can occur in people with certain genetic disorders and very low-weight premature infants.

Some people use vitamin E for treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels including hardening of the arteries, heart attack, chest pain, leg pain due to blocked arteries, and high blood pressure.

Vitamin E is also used for treating diabetes and its complications. It is used for preventing cancer, particularly lung and oral cancer in smokers; colorectal cancer and polyps; and gastric, prostate, and pancreatic cancer.

Some people use vitamin E for diseases of the brain and nervous system including Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, Parkinson’s disease, night cramps, restless leg syndrome, and epilepsy, along with other medications. Vitamin E is also used for Huntington’s chorea, and other disorders involving nerves and muscles.

Read More: How To Prevent Alzheimer’s Naturally 

Women use vitamin E for preventing complications in late pregnancy due to high blood pressure (pre-eclampsia), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), painful periods, menopausal syndrome, hot flashes associated with breast cancer, and breast cysts.

Sometimes vitamin E is used to lessen the harmful effects of medical treatments such as dialysis and radiation. It is also used to reduce unwanted side effects of drugs such as hair loss in people taking doxorubicin and lung damage in people taking amiodarone.

Vitamin E is sometimes used for improving physical endurance, increasing energy, reducing muscle damage after exercise, and improving muscle strength.

Vitamin E is also used for cataracts, asthma, respiratory infections, skin disorders, aging skin, sunburns, cystic fibrosis, infertility, impotence, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), peptic ulcers, for certain inherited diseases and to prevent allergies.

Some people apply vitamin E to their skin to keep it from aging and to protect against the skin effects of chemicals used for cancer therapy (chemotherapy).

The American Heart Association recommends obtaining antioxidants, including vitamin E, by eating a well-balanced diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Free radicals and antioxidants

The real benefits behind vitamin E are found in the seesaw balance of free radicals and antioxidants.

Free radicals in the body are oxygen molecules that lose an electron, which makes them unstable. These unstable molecules interact with cells in the body in a way that can cause damage. As the process snowballs, cells can be damaged and you are made vulnerable to disease.

Free radicals can be created by our bodies as we age, or by everyday factors like digestion or exercise. They’re also caused by exposure to external things like:

  • tobacco smoke
  • ozone
  • environmental pollutants
  • radiation
Vitamin E oil: The basics

Vitamin E oil is derived from vitamin E and can be applied directly to the skin, or added to lotions, creams, and gels. It is available for purchase in many health food stores and online. Many supporters of vitamin E oil argue that it is a potent antioxidant, but research on its benefits is mixed.

Vitamin E oil is distinct from vitamin E supplements because it is applied directly to the skin. Concentrations vary between manufacturers, and some users simply pop open vitamin E capsules and put the contents on their skin.

Vitamin E oil is an ingredient in many skincare products; especially those that claim to have anti-aging benefits.

Vitamin E oil’s benefits are primarily cosmetic and have limited scientific support. Before using vitamin E oil, consult a doctor or skincare expert.

Ten potential benefits

Vitamin E oil’s potential benefits derive from two key features: its antioxidant properties, which could fight inflammation and slow the effects of free radicals, and its moisturizing properties.

Some purported benefits of vitamin E oil include:

Moisturizing skin

Vitamin E is found in many moisturizers, and the oil may be used as a moisturizer to prevent or treat dry, flaking skin.

Wound healing

Some research suggests that vitamin E supplements may promote wound healing. Topical vitamin E oil might offer similar benefits, but there is little research on the subject.

Skin cancer prevention

A 2013 study found that mice given supplements containing vitamin E were less likely to develop skin cancer, even when exposed to large quantities of ultraviolet light. These results prompted some supporters of vitamin E oil and supplements to claim that it can prevent skin cancer.

However, studies on humans have not found any skin cancer prevention benefits associated with vitamin E.

Reducing skin itching

Vitamin E may help to reduce itchy skin and ease eczema.
Vitamin E cannot treat allergic reactions, infections, and other issues that cause skin itching.

Because it moisturizes the skin, however, it may offer temporary relief from itching caused by dry skin.

Keeping skin well moisturized may help to prevent dry skin, and prevent symptoms such as itchiness. Any kind of oil safe for skin may offer these benefits.

Eczema

Vitamin E may alleviate the dryness, itching, and flaking associated with eczema, or atopic dermatitis.

One study found that oral vitamin E supplements could produce significant improvements in eczema symptoms. Though vitamin E oil has not been well-studied in the treatment of eczema, it may increase the effectiveness of topical moisturizers.

Psoriasis

At least one study has linked topical vitamin E to a reduction in psoriasis symptoms. Even better, the study showed that there were no serious side effects.

However, the effects of vitamin E on psoriasis were not as good as most readily available treatments. Vitamin E oil might be a good option for people who want to avoid prescription remedies and who have mild psoriasis.

Preventing or minimizing the appearance of scars

Folk wisdom has long suggested that vitamin E, applied to the skin, taken as a supplement, or both, might treat scars, or prevent them from forming in the first place. But research does not support this claim and has found no association between vitamin E use and scar prevention.

In one older study from 1999, almost one-third of participants had an allergic reaction to topical vitamin E, suggesting the oil is more likely to make scarring worse rather than prevent it.

A more recent literature review found that evidence about whether vitamin E improved or worsened scarring was inconclusive.

Research does suggest that well-moisturized skin is less likely to scar. So for people who do not have an allergic reaction to vitamin E, using it as a moisturizer while the wound heals may offer some benefits.

Preventing or treating fine lines and wrinkles

Dry skin tends to look more wrinkled than well-moisturized skin. The moisturizing benefits of vitamin E oil may help the skin look more youthful and less wrinkled.

Claims that vitamin E prevents or treats wrinkles, however, are unsupported by scientific evidence. The best strategy for preventing wrinkles is to avoid direct sunlight and to wear a quality sunscreen.

Sunburn prevention

Vitamin E may help to reduce the risk of sunburn.
Limited research suggests that vitamin E can prevent or reduce the formation of sunburns.

Because vitamin E oil can moisturize and soothe dry, flaky skin, it may help to relieve the burning and itching that result from a sunburn.

However, wearing sunscreen and avoiding direct sun exposure remain the best strategies for protecting the skin.

Promoting nail health

Research suggests that vitamin E supplementation can prevent yellow nail syndrome, which causes peeling, cracked, and yellowing nails.

Vitamin E oil’s moisturizing benefits may also support nail health by preventing cracked cuticles and dry skin around the nail bed.

Risks and considerations

The biggest risk associated with vitamin E use is an allergic reaction. Vitamin E can irritate the skin, making skin problems worse. People with a history of allergic reactions should avoid vitamin E, or should do a patch test on a small area of skin first.

Because vitamin E oil is a supplement and a beauty product, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate it. This may mean that two vitamin E oils might have radically different concentrations and produce different effects in the same person.

Many vitamin E products contain additional ingredients. It is important to read the label and consult a doctor if uncertain about the product’s safety.

How to use vitamin E

Vitamin E oil and products containing it are available to purchase online and in stores.

Before using vitamin E oil, do a patch test. Apply a small dab of the oil to an area that is not highly visible, such as the back of the knee or behind the ear. Wait 24-48 hours. If no reaction develops, it is probably safe to use.

Do a patch test if using vitamin E on a wound. Apply to a small portion of the wound first and wait 24-48 hours.

Begin with a low concentration of vitamin E oil, and apply a thin layer over the affected area. Over several days, gradually increase the amount until reaching the levels recommended on the package. Read the label carefully and avoid exceeding the recommended dosage.

For even greater benefits, try adding a few drops of vitamin E oil to a thick moisturizing cream. This enhances the cream’s moisturizing benefits and helps buffer any potential irritation.

Antioxidants neutralize free radicals by donating the missing electrons that destabilize them. Antioxidants are found in many foods and are also made in our bodies using the vitamins and minerals found in foods.

How much vitamin E do you need?

Unless your diet is very low in fat, you’re likely getting enough vitamin E. But smoking, air pollution, and even exposure to harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun can deplete your body’s stores of the vitamin.

According to the National Institutes of Health, teenagers and adults should get about 15 mg of vitamin E a day. Pregnant women should get the same, and breastfeeding women should up that to 19 mg.

For children, they recommend 4-5 mg for infants, 6 mg for children between 1-3 years old, 7 mg for those between ages 4-8, and 11 mg from ages 9-13 years.

Vitamin E Rich Foods
  • vegetable oils, especially wheat germ, sunflower, and safflower oils
  • nuts and seeds
  • avocados and other fats
Myths About Vitamin E

Since their identification, free radicals, vitamin E, and other antioxidants have been subject to research for their ability to prevent several diseases.

Macular Degeneration
Macular degeneration is the primary cause of blindness in people age 55 and older. A study conducted by the National Eye Institute found that taking high levels of antioxidants and zinc can decrease your risk of getting advanced macular degeneration by as much as 25 percent.

1. Heart Protection
It’s believed that people with higher levels of vitamin E are at reduced risk of heart disease. But one study that followed over 14,000 U.S. males for eight years found no cardiovascular benefit from taking vitamin E supplements. The study determined that vitamin E was associated with a higher risk of stroke.

2. Cancer
Another study that followed 35,000 men for five years found that taking vitamin E supplements did not affect when it came to lowering any type of cancer risk. A 2011 follow-up found that study participants who had taken vitamin E had a 17 percent higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

3. Skin Healing
Vitamin E is widely touted as a salve that helps speed healing and reduce scarring. While there have been a few studies that support this, the greatest body of research indicates that vitamin E does not help skin wounds heal faster.

One study found that slathering vitamin E oil can actually worsen the appearance of scars, or simply have no effect at all. About a third of participants developed contact dermatitis, which is a type of skin rash.

Conclusion: Taking Vitamin E through food or by supplements included Vitamin E Oil has multiple health benefits especially if we use Vitamin E oil. But first, before start using vitamin E supplements consult with your doctor.

References: healthline.com  webmd.com    

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